Fall Wood, Plato, Choosing, Priority

oak treeFall is overwhelming me. With two fields being mowed, chisel plowed, disked, disked, disked, disked, cultipacked, seeded, and rolled by our contract farmer, the fields have never looked so clean. I can’t keep up with the fire wood, garden conversion from field to greenhouse, outside-income work, and general farm chores. I wonder about the choosing of priorities in work and politics.

A farm of more than a few acres is best as a community entity. Though isolated and short term the various big chores benefit from many hands and minds. Rotating seasonal work around farm lines creates a community of shared types and desires based on how and what is farmed. The large contract farmer takes on several farms.

Communities that extend to others, particularly, past geologic and geographic boundaries have different interests. When they get together they want to talk about different things. Perhaps even a hurt or sick relative is all they can think of.

Choosing politics here seems like choosing the next task I should do on my list. What’s going to affect me soonest, worst, longest? Perhaps whatever task holds my attention can’t be interrupted? Perhaps some past issue causes me to remain moot? Perhaps sheer anger at having to do the task silences conversation. Many ways. I seem to do poorly at resolving these priorities but for reason or I would’t need to think about them.

Reason includes providing information and evidence. Yet, the reasoning is about what to do. You can’t begin to do what you don’t know about. What it is and what to do are intertwined in a braid so tight it can only be cut. Further, you see value in both as attraction, or beauty; even the ugly serves as guide to what is beautiful; you are disgusted about what is not true or right to do or beautiful. Restraint, amidst exploration, follows. Art as well. All to choose what to do next.

Jim Newman, www.frontiersofreason.com

About Jim Newman

Jim Newman is a philosopher. When I was young I wondered what was the ultimate truth. How should I behave? What makes it all work? I was intensely curious to know what it all means. It was enlightening to realize there is no ultimate truth, but nevertheless sufficient and necessary turth, and that meaning was a meta analysis of living one’s life. In this sense my work has been living large. Living and experiencing life has made me learn many things. Building boats, motors, houses, electronics. Raising animals. Teaching. Writing. Photography. Drawing. Knitting. Sewing. Cooking. Music. Painting. Hiking. Aboriginal living skills. All material aspects of reality that seem irrelevant until you realize they allow you to experience more. My epiphany came when I read Christopher Hitchen’s “Letters to a Young Contrarian” and I felt vindicated in my many meals of sacred cow.
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